The West Coast Longshoremen’s Strike of 1934

The West Coast Longshoremen’s Strike of 1934

Before their strike in 1934, dockhands on the West Coast were paid a pittance in exchange for performing bone-crushing physical labor. No matter how heavy or dangerous the cargo, it fell upon the longshoreman to haul it almost entirely by hand: Workers pulled and...
The Steel Strike of 1919

The Steel Strike of 1919

At the turn of the 20th century, industrial expansion was the apple of America’s eye. Factories churned out products from silverware to guns to cars at a breakneck pace. A web of railroads tied the country together. Cities began to expand not just out, but up, with...
Employment, Labor, and the Supreme Court

Employment, Labor, and the Supreme Court

The Supreme Court’s current term will feature a host of cases concerning labor and employment issues. In one case—where arguments have already commenced—the Court will decide on the right of workers to file class-action lawsuits against their employers, and in...
The Great Sit-Down Strike of 1937

The Great Sit-Down Strike of 1937

In the mid-1930s, waking up to work at Flint, Michigan’s car factories meant crawling out of bed and into a nightmare. General Motors (GM) held sway over the town of Flint: Safety regulations were laughable as each day workers sparred with the possibility of injury...
Unions and Worker Happiness

Unions and Worker Happiness

Job satisfaction is organizational mortar; it’s the substance that stabilizes pieces of a whole. Just as weak mortar may lead to loose, crumbling bricks, employees held at their workstations by a meager amount of professional pride and enjoyment are susceptible to...